Documenting your Process

Documenting Your Process

Over the past week, my laptop has been stuck in a 4-hour reboot cycle, I’ve lost the ability to use my keyboard, and my audio automatically mutes on calls.

Needless to say, technology has not been on my side this week.

My tasks have fallen behind and I’ve had to reach out to my team to help me get things done.

Thankfully, we’ve taken the time to create repeatable processes and documentation for a lot of what we do at Trust Insights. I was able to ask for help and point to a standard operating procedure for how to do the task. But it got me thinking, is that normal?

So here is the “so what?” this week – when was the last time you documented your processes?

If the answer is “never” you might be in trouble.

I hear you. I’ve been there, feeling like there is no consistency to what I do so I cannot possibly document it. Or I’m so busy that I cannot take the time to write down what I do.

I’m sure you already know where this is going. You have to make time for documentation and you have to find the repeatability. Why? It will allow you to do a couple of things:

Automate

 

By finding the repeatability in the tasks that you perform you can find opportunities to automate some of what you do. Automation is your friend. I promise. Automating your tasks does not automate you out of a job. What it does is give you back time to do deeper thinking, build relationships, discover insights, and make plans.

Scale

Repeatability and documentation allow you to scale. We just talked about how automation is your friend. It is not only your friend to help you get out of the trenches of doing the same thing over and over, but you can also think about scaling what you’re doing. Automation of repetitive tasks will allow you to let the machines produce more. The consistency and the documentation are the instructions, the machines just need to follow the blueprint. Machines aside, it will help you significantly and save you time when you’re onboarding new team members. Proper documentation of how you do things will allow a new team member to train up quickly and be productive, faster.

Delegate

I don’t know about you, but I love delegating. I especially love delegating things that I don’t enjoy. Before you can delegate, you need to have instructions on how to do the task. Do you see a pattern here? Repeatability and documentation will allow you to teach someone else how to do your tasks the way that you were doing them. Doesn’t that sound great?

I know that I’m probably in the minority of people who enjoy thorough documentation (or maybe I’m not – let’s be friends). However, writing down the steps of what you do will save you time and aggravation when you need help from someone else. Had I not had some documentation on how tasks are complete I wouldn’t have been able to ask for help when my technology failed. Well, I could ask for help but the time it would take to explain the tasks would not have helped move them forward any faster.

Do you love documentation? Do you have questions about how to find repeatability in your tasks? Come find me in our Free Slack Group Analytics for Marketers

 


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